black child - the Anglophone Crisis in Cameroon

THINGS ARE NOT THE SAME AGAIN – CAMEROON 2018

Brother Blaise was a zealous choir member in my church. I still say till date that his days in the choir were my best days in the choir. He had the most mellifluous manly voice. He taught us great songs and I remember a particular medley we did together on a Sunday morning. So soulful, harmonious and it made a music lover like me happy.

Some days ago I yelled at my computer when I saw a picture of brother Blaise on Facebook with comments beneath saying “Rest in Peace”. What? When? How did this happen?

Reading further, I discovered that he died the same way a lot of people in Cameroon die these days. Through gun shots. These days, gunshots are the primary way most people die in Cameroon.

So there goes Brother Blaise, leaving behind family, friends, students (as he was a secondary school teacher) and former church members to mourn him.

Days ago, the same calamity beheld my aunt’s husband. Paw! Paw! Gunshots and he is gone. The sounds of gunshots have become way too familiar these days for those who live in the English speaking parts in Cameroon.

2 years ago. That’s when the trouble started in Cameroon with lawyers and teachers in English-speaking Cameroon demanding fairness from the government in the way they practice their profession.

It is a long story that won’t be told in this blog post but the situation metamorphosed into a time of unease, refugees fleeing from Cameroon into neighboring Nigeria, and just a whole lot of unrest.

Things are not the same again.

Before, when I thought of Cameroon, I thought of good food, a slower way of life and lots of quality time with family and friends. But today, when I think of Cameroon, I think of gunshots, dead bodies lying on streets and tons of people stuck in neighboring Nigeria because home is no longer homely.

This is not exactly how I want to think of the place I am from. But right now I choose to remain hopeful. Hopeful that one day my country’s story will be different. Hopeful that people who have been displaced because of the crisis will be reunited with their families. Hopeful that peace, real peace shall reignpre-signature-pro

10 Comments

  1. Gregory Anderson

    I understand. I am sorry for you and yours as well.
    It is trouble too for my own family and some schoolmates/friends in Nigeria and Uganda. Not the same I know, but when is anything exactly the same between any situation and peoples.

    Just know, Jesus recalls when he once walked in Eden with Adam And Eve. Then the trouble began, and has never ended.

    Be at peace my sister in Christ.
    You are loved.

    _ga-

  2. Stephanie Dorleh

    Looks yummy and sounds awesome. Will give it a trial this weekend; thanks, Precious!

  3. Dear Precious, I really feel so bad to hear about the gun shots in your beloved Country. In fact we the nuns have been seriously praying for the peace in Cameroon and we hope against hope that the good Lord will restore peace in your Country for I believe that He can do it within a twinkle of an eye because he is God. We are together dear sister.

  4. UFEITUGO LAURA

    My dear Meshi, our hearts are heavy. Very heavy.I am one of the displaced persons.I fled home with my kids because the killings were just too much. Now I am almost frustrated in another town.No one to help. After the gunshots, the next ‘killer’ will be hunger. How i wish someone out there could help me and my kids. Lord have mercy!

  5. The killing is global but its only the mercy of God and one has to keep praying that my life and that of my family members will not be used as a sacrifice. The mercy of God will intervene in our countries.

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